When Purchasing a Digital Mixing Console, what to Look for

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There are a number of things that you should think about if you are believing of getting a digital mixing console. Your mixer will be the heart of your recording studio, and supplies the outputs and inputs required for the rest of your devices. Because mixers are pricey, and reconfiguring your setup is a great deal of hassle, it is important to select the right sort of digital mixing console, and to examine that the console has all of the functions you need.

Studio vs Live

Studio mixers are typically made use of for multitrack recording, and as such they have direct outputs for a multitude of channels. On the other hand, live mixers keep an eye on less mixers and simply feed a set of mains. The line between studio and live mixers is starting to blur, so relying on the amount of money you are willing to invest you may be able to get a mixer that can serve both purposes.

Things to look at when getting a digital mixing console consist of:.

The variety of channels.

The more channels your mixer has, the more devices you can link to it. Each channel must have its own equalizer, pan control and auxiliary sends - however keep in mind that some mixers simply offer simple channels then one master output. Take note of the number of channels are stereo and the number of are mono.

Buses.

In addition to channels, a mixer has busses. The mixer's main output is linked to something called the master mix bus, and this is fed by your channel faders. There are normally several auxiliary buses which are fed by the channel faders. Some higher end blending consoles offer a devoted aux bus that can be used for effects, and have an onboard impacts processor or, additionally, a dedicated return channel for impacts.

Direct Outputs and Inserts.

In many cases, a channel's insert point is just after its pre-amp, and you can use specific send out and return jacks, or a special 1/4" place jack with an unique insert cable television for this. Another alternative is to utilize direct outputs to send a copy of the pre-amp signal. This serves to send out a single feed to an external audio user interface or recording device. Groups.

, if you purchase a large format mixer it may have a channel organizing function (which is still often referred to as an antique VCA group).. This makes it simple to manage a a great deal of channels. You are unlikely to require this feature if you are not dealing with a lot of instruments, however if you anticipate your mixing needs to end up being more sophisticated then you must think about buying a mixer with adequate groups for a complete band.

Mute Groups.

Mute groups are a helpful function for live performances. They enable you to, for example, mute the entire band while a reporter is talking, or silence a part of the band during a particular tune. The best mixers permit you to set up "mute scenes" that allow you to mute specific groups rapidly and quickly.

Studio mixers are typically utilized for multitrack recording, and as such they have direct outputs for a big number of channels. In contrast, live mixers keep track of fewer mixers and simply feed a set of mains. The line between studio and live mixers is beginning to blur, so depending on the quantity of cash you are ready to spend you might be able to get a mixer that can serve both purposes.

Each channel needs to have its own equalizer, pan control and auxiliary sends out - nevertheless note that some mixers merely provide rudimentary channels and then one master output. If you purchase a big format mixer it may have a channel grouping feature (which is still in some cases referred to as an antique VCA group). Kick Azz

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